Sri Lankan Food Styles – Exotic Treats to Remember

You need to try Lankan food to appreciate how delicious it is. Creating art on your taste-buds using basic simple materials and a myriad of spices, you get flavours here that you can never tire of.

Rice and Curry | Image Credit - Mayooresan , CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikipedia Commons

Rice and Curry | Image Credit – Mayooresan , CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikipedia Commons

Rice and Curry

A Sri Lankan without his quota of rice and curry for the day will hang his head in sadness. The simple meal is a staple, a favourite and a must-have. Rice is considered the main meal of the day often eaten at lunchtime. Fiery hot curries and milky vegetables make rice and curry a favourite at restaurants in Wattala.

Kiribath (milk rice) | Image Credit - AntanO, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikipedia Commons

Kiribath (milk rice) | Image Credit – AntanO, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikipedia Commons

Kiribath

Sri Lankans are very auspicious and come the first of the month, a birthday, special celebration or New Year and breakfast will consist of kiribath or milk rice. The dish is made with a specific rice rich in starch. Get yourself a good chicken or beef curry and enjoy a generous helping of milk rice when you are holidaying in places such as Pegasus Reef Hotel.

Ambul Thiyal Fish

Ambul Thiyal Fish or Fish Ambul Thiyal is a signature dish of the However, depending on where you have your Fish Ambul Thiyal from, the taste of it would differ. The origin of the dish is from the South; thus, it is quite common to have a Southerner bring a pot of Fish Ambul Thiyal when they are visiting relatives in other parts of the country.

Curd and treacle | Image Credit - Hafiz Issadeen, Dharga Town, Sri Lanka, CC BY 2.0 via Wikipedia Commons

Curd and treacle | Image Credit – Hafiz Issadeen, Dharga Town, Sri Lanka, CC BY 2.0 via Wikipedia Commons

Curd and treacle

As you make your way towards the Southern parts of Sri Lanka, you are sure to see little make-shift shops by the road that sell curd. The curd is fermented buffalo milk and is presented in clay pots. The treacle is often the sugary syrup from palm trees, primarily areca nut. Curd and treacle is a popular dessert option on the island, and Southern curd is high in demand no matter which part of the island you are on.

Roland Lefevre is a travel writer who specializes in creating features on leisure as well as business travel destinations across the globe.

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Sri Lankan Cuisine To Try Out -A Taste of Lanka!

Sri Lanka is a land of many wonders. Take a bite of its feisty and unique cuisine and you’ll discover that some of these wonders can be found in its food as well!

 

Sri Lankan Cuisine | Free-Photos by Pixabay | CC0 Public Domain

Sri Lankan Cuisine | Free-Photos by Pixabay | CC0 Public Domain

 

Rice and Curry

 

 

The amalgamation of rice and curry is a match made in heaven. For many Sri Lankans living a day without eating rice and curry is a day that is not well lived! LOL You will come across this everywhere during your travel here whether you’re sitting down for meal at a café in Galle, at a luxury hotel the likes of the Pegasus Reef Hotel; or at the fine dining restaurants in Wattala, Kandy, Colombo or any other major city. There are many different kinds of rice just as there are curries. If you’re health conscious stick to red or basmati rice. When it comes to curry, they come in all different flavours and colours ranging from the beloved parippu (dhal curry) to the mouthwatering kukul mas (chicken) curry.

 

Milk Rice

 

 

If there’s any event to be celebrated- New Year, first day at school, coming of age or a wedding; Milk Rice will be there at the table. To make Milk Rice, one must first boil the rice with salt then when it’s cooked, add coconut milk and boil again. The cooked rice is then spread on a big plate and when its cooled, cut into either squares or diamond shapes. It’s either served along with the spicy katta sambol or with jaggery (palm sugar).

 

Hoppers

 

 

You’ve got to be hopping mad if you miss hoppers when in Sri Lanka! If you’re wondering what hoppers are, they’re sort of a crispy pancake that’s made out of rice flour. There are four different kinds of hoppers or aappa to try out. The savoury ones are the plain aappa and the biththara aappa or egg hopper. The latter has a egg in the middle of it. Then there are the sweet hoppers, the peni aappa (honey hopper) and the kiri aappa (milk hopper). The savoury ones are eaten with katta sambol and some sort of curry while the sweeter are eaten as they are.

 

Kotthu

 

 

The queen of all street food in Sri Lanka! Koththu is a dish that features strips of godamba roti that’s mixed together with vegetables, fish or meat. This mixing is really interesting to watch and listen. The koththu chef puts everything together on a special flat stove and then chops it up with two steel plates. The noise from all the chopping and the mixing sounds like a mash up of house music / beat boxing!

 

Intrigued by history, art and food, Lavinia Woolf is a writer who is passionate about the extraordinary and writes of the exhilarating and enchanting. Google+

STREET FOOD IN SRI LANKA-TREATS FOR TASTE BUDS

 

From street vendors to wayside eateries, restaurants and up market hotels, street food is there on menus. Wattala is a bustling township on the western coast of Sri Lanka and restaurants in Wattala cater to a wide clientele. If you want to dine amidst stunning seascapes then Pegasus Reef Hotel would be one of the suitable venues to have your meal.

 

Sri Lankan food is known for its super blend of hot spices, creamy curries with coconut milk and rich flavours Stringhoppers made of steamed flour or rice flour and are eaten with spicy sambols and curries. A lavariya is a string-hopper filled with coconut flakes cooked with treacle or sugar. Hoppers or appa are made with a flour or rice flour batter and has crisp edges and soft centers. Hopper variations are egg hoppers or bitthara appa, kiri appa or milk hoppers and pani (treacle) appa. Hoppers are eaten with sambols, curries, or with bananas, jiggery treacle etc. Rotis are flat breads and rotis of flour and coconut are pol roti. Godhamba is another kind of roti and is the basis for the very popular kottu roti. Godhamba rotis are cut into strips and mixed with various mixtures of meat, fish, vegetables, eggs or cheese to make kottus. Vadais are preparations of lentils made into balls flattened and fried. They are spicy and if a prawn is added it is an isso vadai. Vadais made of ulundu flour are ulundu vadai and are eaten with ground green or red coconut sambol. Maalu paan or fish buns, samosas, boiled or devilled chick peas, rolls with different fillings, kola kenda or herbal porridge, barbequed sea food, kebabs, are also popular. Pickles or accharu made with half ripe mangoes, pineapples, wood apples and veralu are very popular. Popular beverages which accompany street food are king coconut, sherbert, lassi and fruit juice. The Galle Face Green is a great place for street food.

 

Intrigued by history, art and food, Lavinia Woolf is a writer who is passionate about the extraordinary and writes of the exhilarating and enchanting. Google+