The History of Sushi – A Scintillating Seafood Sensation!

There is no secret that many people from all around the world love eating Sushi. It is important to know some facts about the evolution of this delicious Japanese dish.

 

What exactly is Sushi?

Before tracing the history of Sushi, it is vital to know about this dish. The word “Sushi” will be an ambiguous term for a non-native Japanese. It means ‘sour’, which reflect the original form of Sushi being a bit sour. The dish includes vinegared rice mixed with a variety of ingredients like vegetables and seafood.

 

History

The history of Sushi is surrounded by folklore and legends. Before it became popular in Japan, it was known in China during the second century A.D. Traditional Sushi took more time to prepare since diverse fermenting steps were required. However, in the early 17th century, the Japanese developed the concept of Sushi by seasoning the rice with rice wine vinegar. Moreover, they diverted from the traditional practice of taking more time to prepare the dish.

 

Hanaya Yohei

Hanaya Yohei is known as the founder of modern Sushi. He introduced ‘Nigiri Sushi’ (finger Sushi) which was prepared by placing a slice of fresh fish on the top of a cube-shaped seasoned rice. This popular quick snack became extremely popular throughout Japan.

 

An artful dining experience

The demand for Sushi is ever increasing! Now, this dish is popular in US, Spain, Denmark and even in many a Japanese restaurant in Maldives including dining venues at Anantara Dhigu Maldives Resort.

 

Fritzjames Stephen is a travel writer, who writes content based on the myriad of experiences and indulgences that the world has to offer travellers across all walks of life. Google+

A Sushi History – Exploring the Origins of an International Culinary Favourite

It’s remarkable how head over heels the world has fallen in love with sushi. Much like the hamburger, the sushi is no longer a Japanese food, but a concept that is utilised throughout the world.

 

Narezushi

This is one of the earliest recorded incarnations of sushi and was invented within the settlements that thrived along the Mekong River. It was prepared by lacto-fermenting fish along with rice and salt.

 

Dictionary Appearance

Sushi appeared within the Chinese vocabulary sometime during the 2nd century AD and emerged during a time when the Han people were expanding southwards of the Mekong River and were discovering new culinary concepts.

 

Japanese Sushi

Namanare was a food popular in Japan and involved partially raw fish that has been wrapped with rice and eaten almost immediately. It is this concept that led to the development of the most popular, maki or roll, type of sushi that you can in anywhere in the world, from California to a Japanese restaurant in Maldives the likes of Anantara Dhigu Maldives Resort.

 

The Rise of the Nigiri

This design, which consists of a fish-slice draped over a mound of rice, was invented quite recently, during the 1820s in fact, by famous chef Hanaya Yohei.

 

Intrigued by history, art and food, Lavinia Woolf is a writer who is passionate about the extraordinary and writes of the exhilarating and enchanting. Google+

Influence of Cumin in Maldivian Cuisine – The Strong Spice

A standout amongst the eldest of flavours, cumin has been utilized for centuries to add its one of a kind flavour to sustenance crosswise over India, the Middle East, the Mediterranean and Africa.

 

Origin

With pilgrims originating from over these locales exchanging and settling on the charming Indian Ocean islands, it was just common that their conventional flavours and flavourings would mix together to make an interesting Indian Ocean food.

 

About

With its solid impacts from India and Sri Lanka, zesty curries frame an imperative piece of Maldivian cooking, particularly the country’s most loved fish curry. Once more, cumin is utilized as one of the key flavours in a mix of coriander, cloves, cinnamon and garlic to make rich, fragrant flavours.

 

Where it is used

In Maldives cumin is a focal flavour to the cari massalé, a mix of flavours including cumin, coriander seeds, dark peppercorns, cardamom, cinnamon, bean stew and nutmeg, which is ground together as the reason for some curries.

File:Garam Masala.JPG

Miansari66Garam Masala, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

 

Curry

The fragrance and warm, somewhat severe, peppery kind of cumin seeds pervade through the delightful curries and sauces of much Indian Ocean food. Many Maldives restaurants use the cumin in their dishes, even places like Anantara Dhigu Maldives Resort.

 

 

Fritzjames Stephen is a travel writer, who writes content based on the myriad of experiences and indulgences that the world has to offer travellers across all walks of life. Google+