The Dine & Wine

Popular Posts

  • Spice plantations in Goa – S…


    Spices are more than just a means of earning income in Goa, which is famed for spices? Spice plantations thrive in Goa due to the tropical climate and the abundance of red soil found here. The plantations can be found … Continue reading


    Read More
  • Fine Dining in Chiang Mai – …


    Escape to the calm tranquility of Thailand’s northern capital, away from the busy streets of Bangkok. Savour some fine food at restaurants in Chiang Mai, enjoy breathtaking mountain views, wander the backstreets and admire fine teak structures, marvel at monasteries … Continue reading


    Read More
  • Eagle Street Pier – Foodie h…


    Brisbane, beloved capital of the state of Queensland and its most populous city, sits on the scenic Brisbane River. Discover a timeless city abuzz with a lively art scene, vibrant nightlife and a wide array of restaurants and cafes that … Continue reading


    Read More
  • Brisbane’s Top Restauran…


    If you are a foodie heading to Brisbane and looking to not only treat your taste buds to the finest in cuisine but also soak up the city’s enchanting ambience then waterfront dining is just the thing. It is quite … Continue reading


    Read More
  • Traditional Khmer Cooking Clas…


    The exploration and indulgence of the cuisine of a place of travel is undoubtedly an integral component of experiencing its culture. As the cuisine is derived and shaped from the natural surroundings of the resident communities, it often provides a … Continue reading


    Read More
  • Japanese Table Manners –…


    In most societies, a set of rigidly-fascinating customs are followed when partaking of a meal. Digressing from the norm can be an alienating feeling, especially in a country like Japan where eating is an art in itself. From taking off … Continue reading


    Read More

Subscribe

Keep up to date by subscribing to the The Dine and Wine RSS feed

Contact

Click here to Contact us for more information
Pin It
http://www.thedineandwine.com/speciality-food-drink-in-maldives-a-spicy-tropical-affair.html

Speciality Food & Drink in Maldives: A Spicy, Tropical Affair

Boasting s 1,192 islands surrounded by crystal-clear, turquoise waters, white, sandy beaches and year-round good weather, Maldives is the ultimate tropical island getaway. While beaches are the country’s star attraction, it often steals the spotlight away from other factors that make Maldives a unique travel destination.

An island nation home to 342,000 inhabitants, Maldivian culture is inspired by the Islamic faith that is practiced by majority of the country’s residents. Even away from the shore there is still much to see and do in Maldives with the country being home to many mosques, boutiques and even has a museum. A little spoken of affair is the country’s local cuisine. Although many luxury resorts offer the best Romantic Dining Maldives options and serve a range of international cuisines, authentic Maldivian food can be found at the local eateries and cafes scattered across Male, which lies 35 minutes away from Naladhu Maldives.

A tropical island destination, sea food naturally holds pride of place in Maldivian cuisine with tuna and swordfish being popular seafood dishes. Apart from seafood, Maldivian curry dishes include delicious, creamy garudhiya or fish soup and chicken and beef curries coloured with green curry leaves and served with fragrant rice or chapathi-like flat breads called roshi. For a light snack, sample the popular Kavaabu, deep-fried snacks made from a delicious blend of rice, lentils, tuna, coconut and spices. Other snacks found in road-side cafes include spicy fish pastries called bajiyaa, fish cakes (kulhi boakibaa), fishballs (gulha) and fish pancakes called masroshi. Popular Maldivian sweets include foni boakiba, githeyo boakiba and huni hakuru folhi.

While premium quality alcoholic beverages are sold in the island’s luxury resorts, alcohol is not sold in Maldives, with the closest beverage to alcohol here being Raa or toddy tapped from palm trees that are left to ferment to create a drink that is slightly alcoholic. Locals however opt for fresh tropical fruit juices, Kurumba or coconut water and the local favourite, black tea known locally as Kalhu Sai.

 

Uditha Dharmawardhane is a travel writer who writes under the pen name Roland Lefevre. He specializes in creating features on leisure as well as business travel destinations across the globe.

Google+


Pin It
http://www.thedineandwine.com/speciality-food-drink-in-maldives-a-spicy-tropical-affair.html

Comments are closed.